Review

I still thought you were looking

Tom Polo

By Paul Kelaita — 10 May, 2019

Carnivals are loud, busy, frenetic places where there seems to be too much to do and too much to see. The rowdy sound of games, rides and children yelling; the wafting smell of quick and greasy food; the flash of lights and costumes. It is a sensorium of plenty, and of abandon. Tom Polo’s exhibition…

Fragile Fantasy

Nicholas Aloisio-Shearer

By Hannah Jenkins — 3 May, 2019

The difference between light and truth: Photography captures light and shadow. The camera captures what’s there in front of it, so, for a time, photography was near synonymous with truth. Nicholas Aloisio-Shearer’s black and white photography tears apart this assumption with both clinical precision and grotesque abandon. His portraits and still lifes appear to show…

Falling from a Broken Ladder

Chris Dolman

By Chelsea Lehmann — 12 April, 2019

‘Judge me, please don’t judge me’ is the subtitle of Manuela Ammer’s catalogue essay on the topic of eccentric figuration, which accompanied the exhibition Painting 2.0: Expression in the information age (2015/16) at the Brandhorst Museum. In this essay, Ammer frames a discussion of Nicole Eisenmann’s work around the concept of the painted body as…

Rhythm of Protest

Lawrence English

By Barnaby Smith — 10 April, 2019

For Lawrence English, sound is seeing. Or to put it more accurately, his work is predicated on the belief that analysing, repurposing, and even distorting sound can reveal hidden or obscured patterns behind cultural phenomena. Sound is a tool for searching. This thinking has always informed his varied (and consistently collaborative) career as an avant-garde…

Janet Laurence:

After Nature

By Prue Gibson — 29 March, 2019

Artist Janet Laurence’s multi-species survey exhibition has now launched at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney. Having exhibited work for over thirty years, Laurence presents a kind of secret charm that is difficult to define. It’s a combination of serious earnestness, childlike joy and fearful knowing. By this I mean that she has read the…

#3 Rayon Riot

Naughty Noodle Fun Haus

By Fiona McGregor — 22 March, 2019

‘Since fun is pleasure without guilt, as in the euphemistic ‘fun-loving’, we are bound to feel it must be inherently trivial; in a Judeo-Christian culture, half the fun of the thing is the guilt, anyway.’ Angela Carter, ‘Fun Fair’   There’s a new show in town. There’s a new town too. An hour and a half…

After Technology

Group Exhibition

By Hannah Jenkins — 15 March, 2019

A speculative review of the UTS Gallery group exhibition After Technology. Future anxieties are too much to process. The old narratives of human beings wielding technology are now obsolete. Instead, technology directs us:  we cultivate and obsess over it; it commercialises and consumes us. My head spins with political echo chambers and lag. I can…

Borrowed Scenery & Nevertheless, she persisted

Group Exhibitions

By Nadia Odlum — 1 March, 2019

To say that discussions of gender equality were prevalent in 2018 would be a gross understatement. Marches, movements, protests, trials and new accusations brought these conversations to the fore—both locally and internationally—and in the arts as much as in other sectors. As we move into 2019, two Sydney exhibitions are ensuring that these conversations stay…

The TV Show

Group Exhibition

By Carrie Miller — 15 February, 2019

Digital culture is often celebrated for its democratising power—the emancipatory capacity for almost anyone to produce and transmit images. At the same time, the mainstreaming of digital technologies has caused profound anxiety. There is a fear that our ability to generate endless images of ourselves in order to be ‘liked’ has fuelled an epidemic of…