Review

Day For Night

Liveworks 2019

By Fiona McGregor — 8 November, 2019

I have to start with the best: Betty Grumble’s Unshame Machine, in which she did a record 1000 cunt prints on a machine resembling a lat pulldown, accompanied by three of the finest new performers in that ever-evolving organism we loosely term the Sydney queer underground. Stelly G, whom many know from hosting at the…

Long Day’s Journey Into Night

Bi Gan

By Michael Sun — 6 November, 2019

Watching Bi Gan’s Long Day’s Journey Into Night (2018), I am reminded of another film: Vanilla Sky (2001). I have never seen it, but I have read the Wikipedia summary many times, often in periods of procrastination, or late at night, when the only thing that will quell my anxiety is the mental image of…

Body of Knowledge

Samara Hersch

By Marcus Whale — 1 November, 2019

Partway through Body of Knowledge, Samara Hersch’s new performance for Liveworks, an attendee’s phone goes off. Except, it’s not exactly their phone, but one assigned to them—a smartphone. In fact, each of the dozen-or-so audience members has been assigned a device, and by the time it’s my turn to participate, almost everyone has a phone…

Illuminating the Wilderness

Project Art Works

By Chloe Watfern — 16 October, 2019

The social organism is a scribbled line. It’s a line passed from hand to hand across a big sheet of paper. It means nothing and everything. Deep in the Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA), behind the double glass doors of the National Centre for Creative Learning, a man is drawing a rocket. The rocket is…

Cosmopolitan

organised by Rafaela Pandolfini with Jana Hawkins-Andersen

By Claire Cao — 19 September, 2019

It takes a 50-minute train ride and two buses to get from South-West Sydney to Rushcutters Bay. Trips of such length and commitment are punctuated by interesting characters: teens with bum bags talking a big game about their sexual conquests; aunties propping their callused feet up on the seats; a woman chomping on a lamb…

The essayist

Curated by Jasmin Stephens

By Melinda Reid — 10 September, 2019

At the August opening of The essayist at The Cross Arts Projects, I found myself feeling the combined effects of the anti-inflammatories I’d taken for a sore back, the surprisingly warm afternoon weather, a room full of new works, and a recently digested dense ginger tart. The conditions were ripe for a brief daydream. I…

Apókryphos

Cherine Fahd

By Emily Stewart — 6 September, 2019

Eight years ago Cherine Fahd’s grandmother gave her a collection of family photos. In a nondescript envelope Fahd found pictures from her grandfather’s funeral; he had died too young, when she was still a baby. Although Fahd and her grandmother were very close, the pictures revealed a grief that had been otherwise unarticulated her whole…

The Promised Land

Michael Armitage

By Lucie Reeves-Smith — 13 August, 2019

A fortnight of equatorial downpours preceded the opening of Michael Armitage’s solo exhibition, The Promised Land, at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney. With a heavy blanket of humidity cast across the city, this oppressive atmosphere seemed to sit comfortably alongside the bright colours and rotting surfaces of his paintings. Slick and warm, the…