Review

Ok Democracy, we need to talk

Group Exhibition

By Rebecca Hall — 17 July, 2019

In place of a wall text, OK Democracy, We Need to Talk leads with a TV screen that plays a brief, simulated text conversation—a digital quarrel—between the curators and ‘Democracy’: I think things could be better between us. You’ve changed… OMG…is this a conversation or a provocation!? It is both—according to the extended curatorial statement…

One Child Nation

Nanfu Wang &

Jialing Zhang

By Claire Cao — 5 July, 2019

The birth of Communist China heralded an explosion of life. Cocooned in the monumental shadows of the Gate of Heavenly Peace, Mao Zedong publicly avowed that a greater population meant greater power for his fledgling state. Like blood haemorrhaging from a cut, births increased—by the late ‘70s, China had a population of more than 900…

My Nudity Means Nothing

Marina de Van

By Eloise Grills — 2 July, 2019

  In the pre-Jackie period, when I was on Tinder, my friend and I engaged in a contest to see how many people we could sleep with.     I only amassed four bedpost notches before I quit. I am a bad dater. I hate going out, sleeping in beds that aren’t mine.    …

Club 4A

Curated by Mathew Spisbah

and Rainbow Chan

By Amelia Zhou — 18 June, 2019

I am dancing in the club and thinking how many times I’ve gone out wishing I’d stayed in. Earlier, I read Summer Kim Lee’s article on obliged forms of sociability. Her conception of ‘staying in’ is a refutation against the exhaustive demand to be active in any given moment. It can be a politics of…

Witkacy & Malinowski: a cinematic séance in 23 scenes

John Gillies

By Tyler Patterson — 11 June, 2019

On the first day of spring in 1914, a train tore through the Australian countryside en route to Toowoomba from Brisbane. Belching smoke and swallowing shovelful after shovelful of coal, it carried the anthropologist Bronislaw Malinowski, who was touring Australia with the British Association for the Advancement of Science Congress, and his childhood friend—the artist-playwright…

I still thought you were looking

Tom Polo

By Paul Kelaita — 10 May, 2019

Carnivals are loud, busy, frenetic places where there seems to be too much to do and too much to see. The rowdy sound of games, rides and children yelling; the wafting smell of quick and greasy food; the flash of lights and costumes. It is a sensorium of plenty, and of abandon. Tom Polo’s exhibition…

Fragile Fantasy

Nicholas Aloisio-Shearer

By Hannah Jenkins — 3 May, 2019

The difference between light and truth: Photography captures light and shadow. The camera captures what’s there in front of it, so, for a time, photography was near synonymous with truth. Nicholas Aloisio-Shearer’s black and white photography tears apart this assumption with both clinical precision and grotesque abandon. His portraits and still lifes appear to show…

Falling from a Broken Ladder

Chris Dolman

By Chelsea Lehmann — 12 April, 2019

‘Judge me, please don’t judge me’ is the subtitle of Manuela Ammer’s catalogue essay on the topic of eccentric figuration, which accompanied the exhibition Painting 2.0: Expression in the information age (2015/16) at the Brandhorst Museum. In this essay, Ammer frames a discussion of Nicole Eisenmann’s work around the concept of the painted body as…

Rhythm of Protest

Lawrence English

By Barnaby Smith — 10 April, 2019

For Lawrence English, sound is seeing. Or to put it more accurately, his work is predicated on the belief that analysing, repurposing, and even distorting sound can reveal hidden or obscured patterns behind cultural phenomena. Sound is a tool for searching. This thinking has always informed his varied (and consistently collaborative) career as an avant-garde…