Review

After Technology

Group Exhibition

By Hannah Jenkins — 15 March, 2019

A speculative review of the UTS Gallery group exhibition After Technology. Future anxieties are too much to process. The old narratives of human beings wielding technology are now obsolete. Instead, technology directs us:  we cultivate and obsess over it; it commercialises and consumes us. My head spins with political echo chambers and lag. I can…

Borrowed Scenery & Nevertheless, she persisted

Group Exhibitions

By Nadia Odlum — 1 March, 2019

To say that discussions of gender equality were prevalent in 2018 would be a gross understatement. Marches, movements, protests, trials and new accusations brought these conversations to the fore—both locally and internationally—and in the arts as much as in other sectors. As we move into 2019, two Sydney exhibitions are ensuring that these conversations stay…

The TV Show

Group Exhibition

By Carrie Miller — 15 February, 2019

Digital culture is often celebrated for its democratising power—the emancipatory capacity for almost anyone to produce and transmit images. At the same time, the mainstreaming of digital technologies has caused profound anxiety. There is a fear that our ability to generate endless images of ourselves in order to be ‘liked’ has fuelled an epidemic of…

One Infinity

PLAYKING PRODUCTIONS, DANCENORTH,

JUN TIAN FANG & BEIJING DANCE THEATRE

By Amelia Zhou — 13 February, 2019

It’s easy to forget how to listen. To listen deeply, that is. I’m reminded of this at One Infinity, a collaborative performance by Playking Productions, Jun Tian Fang, Beijing Dance Theatre and Dancenorth. I’m reminded of attentiveness, or how to listen in order to feel—to be swept up inside the layers of a live moment….

Xhe

Daniel Kok

& Miho Shimizu

By Soo-Min Shim — 16 November, 2018

Walking into the last two hours of Daniel Kok and Miho Shimizu’s five-hour performance of xhe, I am overwhelmed by the kaleidoscopic playground of polychrome fabrics, foam block shapes, iridescent blankets, and printed cardboard cutouts. There are chairs arranged around the perimeters, but mostly these are empty. Instead, groups of people are gathered around a…

Infinity Minus One

Su Wen-Chi

By Kathleen Linn — 9 November, 2018

In 2016, Taiwanese performance artist and choreographer Su Wen-Chi undertook a six-week residency at CERN (The European Centre for Nuclear Research) in Geneva, Switzerland. She drew inspiration from this residency to create a suite of three works: Rainbow Trilogy, which includes Infinity Minus One. The Micro and the Macro The stage is bare, except for…

An Image of a Tiger

Jess Bradford

By Naomi Riddle — 2 November, 2018

The website for the Singaporean cultural park Haw Par Villa (formerly known as the Tiger Balm Garden) proclaims that the park is a ‘treasure trove of Asian culture, history, philosophy and religion—quirky yet enlightening, at the same time.’ Built in 1937 by Aw Boon Haw, a millionaire philanthropist who marketed Tiger Balm ointment to the…

Uncanny Valley Girl

Angela Goh

By Amelia Wallin — 26 October, 2018

Silicone breast-enhancing inserts, self-massage tools, flat screen televisions and their associated cables, cans of ‘Mother’ energy drink, and a boxy wind blower. These objects of artificial simulation constitute the set of Angela Goh’s Uncanny Valley Girl at Liveworks Festival, and generate many of Goh’s performative actions. Everything appears synthetic, down to her pleather footwear and…

The Public Body .03

Group Exhibition

By Paul Kelaita — 12 October, 2018

There’s a provocative question asked in one of the many video works in The Public Body .03 that lasts for only a second—‘but what if a species is nothing more than a set of relationships?’ The question appears in Korakrit Arunanondchai’s ‘with history in a room filled with people with funny names 4’ (2017), a…