Tag: Museum of Contemporary Art

Illuminating the Wilderness

Project Art Works

By Chloe Watfern — 16 October, 2019

The social organism is a scribbled line. It’s a line passed from hand to hand across a big sheet of paper. It means nothing and everything. Deep in the Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA), behind the double glass doors of the National Centre for Creative Learning, a man is drawing a rocket. The rocket is…

The Promised Land

Michael Armitage

By Lucie Reeves-Smith — 13 August, 2019

A fortnight of equatorial downpours preceded the opening of Michael Armitage’s solo exhibition, The Promised Land, at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney. With a heavy blanket of humidity cast across the city, this oppressive atmosphere seemed to sit comfortably alongside the bright colours and rotting surfaces of his paintings. Slick and warm, the…

The land between us:

On James Nguyen’s ‘Portion 53’

By Soo-Min Shim — 7 June, 2019

This is the third instalment of Running Dog’s feature series responding to individual works in The National 2019: New Australian Art—on view at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Carriageworks and the Museum of Contemporary Art, and curated by Isobel Parker Philip (AGNSW), Daniel Mudie Cunningham (Carriageworks), Clothilde Bullen and Anna Davis (MCA).    After…

Janet Laurence:

After Nature

By Prue Gibson — 29 March, 2019

Artist Janet Laurence’s multi-species survey exhibition has now launched at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney. Having exhibited work for over thirty years, Laurence presents a kind of secret charm that is difficult to define. It’s a combination of serious earnestness, childlike joy and fearful knowing. By this I mean that she has read the…

John Mawurndjul:

I am the old and the new

By Susie Anderson — 20 September, 2018

two ways at Maningrida they never stopped climbing trees found a way to keep mardayin ceremony but some were taken too unscroll bark canvas work with fire smell thick in air on walls Ngalyod rainbow serpent bodies coiled together power in its bones these words are better poetry all I know is only written but…

Lethal Love

Haegue Yang

By Soo-Min Shim — 30 May, 2018

In one of the opening scenes of Billy Wilder’s archetypal film, Double Indemnity (1944), the protagonist Walter Neff walks around an unassuming living room typical of the late 1930s. He strolls nonchalantly past an armchair and two everyday lamps, but an ominous feeling still pervades the scene. A long shot frames Walter, causing the shadows…